LearningPortuguese

Numbers

There is some variation in the spelling of numbers between European and Brazilian Portuguese. The numbers given below should be sufficient to enable you to work out all of the numbers in-between. Numbers that are not in bold-type are given as examples of how you would combine the bold-type components.

Instead of using a full stop to indicate a decimal point, the Portuguese language requires a comma (or ‘vírgula’ in Portuguese). So a number containing a decimal fraction (take for example, ‘2.34’), is written and spoken with a comma like this: 2,34 = dois vírgula três quatro.

In a similar vein, whereas in English we use a comma to separate our thousands from our millions, etc., the Portuguese use a full stop (or ‘ponto’). So one million and three is written like this: ‘1.000.003’. In order to help you get used to this, I have written the numerals below using the Portuguese style.

Cardinal Numbers (Números Cardinais)

0

zero

1

um/uma

2

dois/duas

3

três

4

quatro

5

cinco

6

seis

7

sete

8

oito

9

nove

10

dez

11

onze

12

doze

13

treze

14

catorze (Brazilians sometimes use quatorze)

15

quinze

16

dezasseis (Brazilian: dezesseis)

17

dezassete (Brazilian: dezessete)

18

dezoito

19

dezanove (Brazilian: dezenove)

20

vinte

21

vinte e um/uma

22

vinte e dois/duas

23

vinte e três

30

trinta

31

trinta e um/uma

40

quarenta

50

cinquenta (Brazilians might still use a diaeresis: cinqüenta)

60

sessenta

70

setenta

80

oitenta

90

noventa

100

cem (note: ‘cem’ is only used if the next 2 digits are zeros – otherwise, use ‘cento’)

101

cento e um/uma

102

cento e dois/duas

120

cento e vinte

121

cento e vinte e um/uma

122

cento e vinte e dois/duas

200

duzentos/duzentas

201

duzentos/duzentas e um/uma

300

trezentos/trezentas

400

quatrocentos/quatrocentas

500

quinhentos/quinhentas

600

seiscentos/seiscentas

700

setecentos/setecentas

800

oitocentos/oitocentas

900

novecentos/novecentas

1.000

mil

1.001

mil e um/uma

1.985

mil novecentos e oitenta e cinco (the first ‘e’ is dropped)

2.000

dois mil/duas mil

3.000

três mil

10.000

dez mil

100.000

cem mil

100.001

cem mil e um/uma

101.000

cento e um/uma mil

125.000

cento e vinte e cinco mil

500.000

quinhentos mil

735.346

setecentos e trinta e cinco mil trezentos e quarenta e seis

1.000.000

um milhão (unlike ‘mil’, the preceeding number [in this case, um] is required with milhão and bilião)

1.537.469

um milhão quinhentos e trinta e sete mil quatrocentos e sessenta e nove

1.000.000.000

mil milhão (um bilhão in Brazil)

1.000.000.000.000

um bilião (um trilhão in Brazil)

The word ‘e’ (meaning ‘and’), as used when speaking or writing numbers in full, appears more frequently in Portuguese than in English. It is generally used between all major components (the bold-type numbers), but for every group of 3 numbers (thousand, million, billion, etc.), the ‘e’ is dropped unless the last 2 digits of the group are both zero. Hence…

1.200.300

um milhão e duzentos mil e trezentos

1.214.379

um milhão, duzentos e catorze mil, trezentos e setenta e nove

1.200.379

um milhão e duzentos mil, trezentos e setenta e nove

1.214.300

um milhão, duzentos e catorze mil e trezentos

Ordinal Numbers (Números Ordinais)

English Notation

Portuguese Notation

Portuguese Words

1st

1º/1ª

primeiro/primeira

2nd

2º/2ª

segundo/segunda

3rd

3º/3ª

terceiro/terceira (‘terça’ is occasionally used as a short-cut in compound words – eg. ‘terça-feira’)

4th

4º/4ª

quarto/quarta

5th

5º/5ª

quinto/quinta

6th

6º/6ª

sexto/sexta

7th

7º/7ª

sétimo/sétima

8th

8º/8ª

oitavo/oitava

9th

9º/9ª

nono/nona

10th

10º/10ª

décimo/décima

11th

11º/11ª

décimo primeiro/décima primeira

12th

12º/12ª

décimo segundo/décima segunda

20th

20º/20ª

vigésimo/vigésima

21st

21º/21ª

vigésimo primeiro

30th

30º/30ª

trigésimo/trigésima

40th

40º/40ª

quadragésimo/quadragésima

50th

50º/50ª

quinquagésimo/quinquagésima (Brazilians sometimes use the diaeresis: qüinquagésimo/a)

60th

60º/60ª

sexagésimo/sexagésima

70th

70º/70ª

septuagésimo/septuagésima (the ‘p’ is virtually silent – Brazilian spelling: setuagésimo/a)

80th

80º/80ª

octagésimo/octagésima

90th

90º/90ª

nonagésimo/nonagésima

100th

100º/100ª

centésimo/centésima

So, ‘one fifth’ is ‘um quinto’, ‘one eighth’ is ‘um oitavo’, etc. (‘one third’ uses the shortened form ‘um terço’). Note though, that the Portuguese use cardinal numbers for dates, not ordinal like we do in English (see section on days, dates and times).

Buy the Book!

Available in paperback or as an eBook

cover4 tiny

  • Entire pronunciation and grammar guide of this website included
  • Expanded and updated
  • Extra content on subjects not covered on the site
  • Over 500 exercises with translations and solutions
  • Verb tables for regular and the most common irregular verbs
  • Extra reference and vocabulary

More Information